Starting Therapy

Session Outlines

What to expect

During your “consultation” appointment:

  • You will define your journey
  • We will get to know each other
  • You will have opportunities to ask questions
  • You will decide if therapy is right for you
  • We will enter our therapeutic relationship

During your “psychiatric evaluation” appointment:

  • We will talk about your history and other areas that are important to you 
  • We will wrap up any unfinished client paperwork together
  • We will develop your route map and set goals
  • We will schedule your first therapy session

During your regular “60 minute therapy session” appointments:

  • First, 5-10 minutes we will check in, discuss any at home activities or “homework” if applicable
  • Review our “map” (review treatment plan if needed, set goals and agenda for the session)
  • Middle, 30-40 minutes we will work on the agenda
  • Remaining, 5-10 minutes we will wrap up, review our session, go over at home activities or “homework”, make a plan and schedule our next session.
  • Throughout the first 50 minutes we will continue to strengthen our therapeutic relationship
  • At the end of our session your provider will utilize the remaining 5-10 minutes to write notes on the session and therapy progress. If you prefer to collaborate on therapy progress notes please discuss it with your provider prior to the session.
In general:
  • Confidentiality. There are laws that protect the communication between a client and therapist. In most cases, the information you share with your provider cannot and will not be disclosed to anyone without your written permission.  Exceptions to confidentiality include: suspected child abuse, dependent/at risk person abuse or elder abuse, threats of serious physical harm or death to others or imminent danger to yourself.
  • Experience and Education. All providers are master’s level educated with experience in their listed specializations and engage in ongoing continuing education as required by their license or provisional license.
  • A strengths-based approach. Providers are there to help you identify the characteristics in you that help you grow in a positive direction and motivate you to continue putting one foot in front of the other on your path, towards your goal.
  • Cultural Competence. All providers are mindful about differences between and within various cultures and are committed to educating themselves on issues effecting different cultures so that you do not feel you are educating them during your session. They are sex-positive and culturally sensitive. Providers may ask you to clarify what something means to you, in an effort not to assume their experiences are the same as yours.
  • Skills. Your provider is there to help you learn how to listen and communicate effectively. They are there to show you different ways of seeing things, to identify ways to manage intense emotions and develop a customized plan to change patterns of behavior that brought you to psychotherapy.
  • Integration. All providers understand that you need support. They are committed to focusing on offering and providing integrated care whenever possible and appropriate; working with all other individuals engaged in providing services towards your well-being (with your written permission). Possible areas of integration: primary care provider, psychiatrist, physical therapist, occupational therapist, massage therapist, family or immigration lawyer, AA sponsor, family, friends, etc.
What NOT to expect:
  • For your provider to judge you or shame you. Why not? Because it is not helpful to you and goes against our pledge to “do no harm”.
  • For your provider to give you advice, tell you how to live your life, which direction to go. Why not? You alone define your journey. Your provider cannot and will not live with the outcomes of those decisions.
  • For your provider to “gang up” on you or take sides against you or any other person in couples, family, polycule therapy. Why not? The relationship (between you all) is the client and your provider is aware that remaining neutral is the best way to be a guide on the journey and not become part of the problem.
  • For your provider to assume your experience is the same as theirs or anyone else’s. Why not? Your provider knows that every journey is unique. They have no knowledge of where you have been or foresight into where you are going. You determine when you have arrived.
  • For your provider to provide services to couples, triads or polycule/families that are actively violent with one another. Why not? Safety needs to come first. It is important to address unhealthy individual behaviors before the larger group work can be done effectively.
616632_10151948196300508_1168441349_o 1
Chanijohn-01 (1)

Along Your Journey

Mailing Address: P.O Box 1132 Fort Morgan, CO 80701

© 2019 Along Your Journey | All Rights Reserved

Starting Therapy

616632_10151948196300508_1168441349_o 1

Session Outlines

What to expect

During your “consultation” appointment:

  • You will define your journey
  • We will get to know each other
  • You will have opportunities to ask questions
  • You will decide if therapy is right for you
  • We will enter our therapeutic relationship

During your “psychiatric evaluation” appointment:

  • We will talk about your history and other areas that are important to you 
  • We will wrap up any unfinished client paperwork together
  • We will develop your route map and set goals
  • We will schedule your first therapy session

During your regular “60 minute therapy session” appointments:

  • First, 5-10 minutes we will check in, discuss any at home activities or “homework” if applicable
  • Review our “map” (review treatment plan if needed, set goals and agenda for the session)
  • Middle, 30-40 minutes we will work on the agenda
  • Remaining, 5-10 minutes we will wrap up, review our session, go over at home activities or “homework”, make a plan and schedule our next session.
  • Throughout the first 50 minutes we will continue to strengthen our therapeutic relationship
  • At the end of our session your provider will utilize the remaining 5-10 minutes to write notes on the session and therapy progress. If you prefer to collaborate on therapy progress notes please discuss it with your provider prior to the session.
In general:
  • Confidentiality. There are laws that protect the communication between a client and therapist. In most cases, the information you share with your provider cannot and will not be disclosed to anyone without your written permission.  Exceptions to confidentiality include: suspected child abuse, dependent/at risk person abuse or elder abuse, threats of serious physical harm or death to others or imminent danger to yourself.
  • Experience and Education. All providers are master’s level educated with experience in their listed specializations and engage in ongoing continuing education as required by their license or provisional license.
  • A strengths-based approach. Providers are there to help you identify the characteristics in you that help you grow in a positive direction and motivate you to continue putting one foot in front of the other on your path, towards your goal.
  • Cultural Competence. All providers are mindful about differences between and within various cultures and are committed to educating themselves on issues effecting different cultures so that you do not feel you are educating them during your session. They are sex-positive and culturally sensitive. Providers may ask you to clarify what something means to you, in an effort not to assume their experiences are the same as yours.
  • Skills. Your provider is there to help you learn how to listen and communicate effectively. They are there to show you different ways of seeing things, to identify ways to manage intense emotions and develop a customized plan to change patterns of behavior that brought you to psychotherapy.
  • Integration. All providers understand that you need support. They are committed to focusing on offering and providing integrated care whenever possible and appropriate; working with all other individuals engaged in providing services towards your well-being (with your written permission). Possible areas of integration: primary care provider, psychiatrist, physical therapist, occupational therapist, massage therapist, family or immigration lawyer, AA sponsor, family, friends, etc.
What NOT to expect:
  • For your provider to judge you or shame you. Why not? Because it is not helpful to you and goes against our pledge to “do no harm”.
  • For your provider to give you advice, tell you how to live your life, which direction to go. Why not? You alone define your journey. Your provider cannot and will not live with the outcomes of those decisions.
  • For your provider to “gang up” on you or take sides against you or any other person in couples, family, polycule therapy. Why not? The relationship (between you all) is the client and your provider is aware that remaining neutral is the best way to be a guide on the journey and not become part of the problem.
  • For your provider to assume your experience is the same as theirs or anyone else’s. Why not? Your provider knows that every journey is unique. They have no knowledge of where you have been or foresight into where you are going. You determine when you have arrived.
  • For your provider to provide services to couples, triads or polycule/families that are actively violent with one another. Why not? Safety needs to come first. It is important to address unhealthy individual behaviors before the larger group work can be done effectively.
Chanijohn-01 (1)

Along Your Journey

Mailing Address: P.O Box 1132 Fort Morgan, CO 80701

© 2019 Along Your Journey | All Rights Reserved